"There can be no real freedom without the freedom to fail."

— Erich Fromm   (via psicologicamenteblog)

(via psicologicamenteblog)

thegadaboutgirl:

whowasntthere:

championofazura:

Girls, romanticize yourselves. You are a queen. You are a warrior. You are an enchantress. You are a mermaid. You are a goddess. You are all of these things and more, you are the stuff of fairytales. 

Women, traumatize others. You are a dragon. You are a wolf. You are a bump in the night. You are the last thing they see in the darkness. You are all of these things and more, you are the heart of their fucking nightmares.

image

(via thos-damn-cheetahs)

lllnomadlll:

Disturbia | Digital Drawing
For more of my art visit me here:
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How To Speak Like You’re On ‘Game Of Thrones’

huffpostbooks:

M’athchomaroon!

Hello! (lit.: With respect!)

M’ath!/M’ach!

Hi! (short for M’athchomaroon!)

Athchomar chomakaan!

Hello! (to a non-Dothraki, singular) (lit.: Respect to one that is respectful!)

Athchomar chomakea!

Hello! (to non-Dothraki, plural) (lit.: Respect to those that are respectful!)

Aena shekhikhi!

Good morning! (lit.: Morning of light!)

Read more here.

(via samieryan)

whosaprettypolyglot:

germannn:

I have to admit that I’m sometimes not completely sure myself. But that’s probably only the case when both is possible.
Anyways, here are some rules that might help: 
1. After nouns that end in s, ß, x, z follows often es.

2. After nouns that end in an unstressed -e, -el, -er, -en, -chen, -lein, or -ling follows always s.

3. After many nouns that end in an unstressed syllable follows s.

4. After most loanwords/foreign words follows s.

The same rule applies especially to foreign words if their plural form ends in s as well.

5. After words that belong to a certain group of inflections follows s. These groups are:
s/e, example:








(complete list of words belonging to this group)







s/-, example: 








(complete list of words belonging to this group)







s/s, example:








(complete list of words belonging to this group)







s/en (foreign), example:








(complete list of words belonging to this group)







s/foreign plural, example:








(complete list of words belonging to this group)







6. Problem: there are many, many words that can end either in s or es. Both is possible. The list is endless, but some examples are:

(source)
As you can see, the genitive case is horribly complicated because there are almost no rules that clearly tell you what ending to use for which word. So it is actually easier to learn the genitive ending together with new nouns. It sounds like a lot of work but in the end it will save time.
[Made rebloggable on request. I deleted the old post.]

As far as I’m aware, the general rule of thumb is just follow the pronunciation - if it’s awkward or impractical to use just an s, stick the e in there before it just to make it easier to say. Try saying both out loud and then decide.whosaprettypolyglot:

germannn:

I have to admit that I’m sometimes not completely sure myself. But that’s probably only the case when both is possible.
Anyways, here are some rules that might help: 
1. After nouns that end in s, ß, x, z follows often es.

2. After nouns that end in an unstressed -e, -el, -er, -en, -chen, -lein, or -ling follows always s.

3. After many nouns that end in an unstressed syllable follows s.

4. After most loanwords/foreign words follows s.

The same rule applies especially to foreign words if their plural form ends in s as well.

5. After words that belong to a certain group of inflections follows s. These groups are:
s/e, example:








(complete list of words belonging to this group)







s/-, example: 








(complete list of words belonging to this group)







s/s, example:








(complete list of words belonging to this group)







s/en (foreign), example:








(complete list of words belonging to this group)







s/foreign plural, example:








(complete list of words belonging to this group)







6. Problem: there are many, many words that can end either in s or es. Both is possible. The list is endless, but some examples are:

(source)
As you can see, the genitive case is horribly complicated because there are almost no rules that clearly tell you what ending to use for which word. So it is actually easier to learn the genitive ending together with new nouns. It sounds like a lot of work but in the end it will save time.
[Made rebloggable on request. I deleted the old post.]

As far as I’m aware, the general rule of thumb is just follow the pronunciation - if it’s awkward or impractical to use just an s, stick the e in there before it just to make it easier to say. Try saying both out loud and then decide.

Listening to classical music on the radio

augmented-flute:

Me: I’m not sure who this is, but I like it.

Me: Sounds kind of Romantic…..

Me:

Me:

Me:

Me: Oh, duh! This is a Beethoven piece!!!!

Me:

Me: :)

Me:

Radio DJ: And that was Hayden Symphony number 300,000,008

(via valkyriemusic)

erdbeerwolken:

What? :D
gharibafisabilillah:

"Oppressed" Muslim Women 
gharibafisabilillah:

"Oppressed" Muslim Women 
gharibafisabilillah:

"Oppressed" Muslim Women 
gharibafisabilillah:

"Oppressed" Muslim Women 
gharibafisabilillah:

"Oppressed" Muslim Women 
gharibafisabilillah:

"Oppressed" Muslim Women 
gharibafisabilillah:

"Oppressed" Muslim Women 
gharibafisabilillah:

"Oppressed" Muslim Women 
gharibafisabilillah:

"Oppressed" Muslim Women 
gharibafisabilillah:

"Oppressed" Muslim Women 
theniftyfifties:

Pinups on a road trip, 1950s.
rhubarbes:

Robin Williams and Jeff Bridges in The Fisher King from Terry Gilliam.
(via Terry Gilliam)
tokyo-fashion:

Omotesando Dori in Harajuku at 2:30am this morning. The road was closed to traffic because the tree branches were breaking from all of the snow!